OCD and Fake News - The brain is a machine for jumping to conclusions.

OCD is just fake news that your brain makes up.
But there is effective treatment.

By now, virtually anyone with even a passing interest in politics and current events has heard the term “fake news”. If you haven’t heard this term, just turn on a cable news channel on any given day and you are bound to hear a news story (or ten) about how we are being inundated with fake news that is designed to alter our political beliefs (and our votes). Regardless of your political persuasion, a Google search of the term “fake news” will lead you to a multitude of articles that describe somebody (or some country) that is presenting reality in a distorted fashion in an attempt to persuade you to see things their way. So what does this have to with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)? Allow us to explain…

The writers and producers of fake news stories manipulate reality, sometimes by taking facts out of context, and other times by entirely fabricating story details (i.e., lying). Fake news stories always build their narrative on what can most charitably be called “unsubstantiated claims”. But even a cursory examination of these claims would lead any objective observer to conclude that these stories are at best misleading, and at worst, utterly untrue. The stories aren’t backed up by facts, but they sound just real enough to seem feasible.

And this is exactly what OCD does – it offers up scary thoughts for which there is no factual support, yet which appear plausible enough to lead one to believe that they may actually be true. OCD takes unimportant thoughts that occur in one’s mind completely out of the context of the real world and who the individual actually is as a person, and fabricates nightmarish scenarios (i.e., obsessions) that are not even remotely based in reality. But because these obsessive thoughts initially manifest in the sufferer’s own mind, they seem realistic, even though there is no compelling evidence to support them. In other words, OCD is fake news written, produced and directed by your own wayward brain.
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Exposure Therapy for OCD and Anxiety

Exposure therapy is the key to
effective treatment for OCD and anxiety.

At the heart of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for OCD and related anxiety disorders is the process of “exposure therapy”. There are numerous variations on exposure therapy, depending on which specific condition is being treated – for example for OCD, the treatment of choice is a specific therapy called Exposure and Response Prevention (ERP). All variations of exposure therapy focus on the same core principle, which is that those suffering from these conditions will experience the greatest reduction in their symptoms by repeatedly doing the very thing that most terrifies them, without responding with any behaviors that are meant to reduce or control their anxiety.

For someone with OCD focused on contamination fears, exposure therapy will likely include purposely touching doorknobs or other allegedly “dirty” items without then washing. For those with variants of Pure Obsessional OCD (Pure O), effective treatment will almost certainly include imaginal exposure, in which the client purposely and repeatedly thinks the very thoughts that they would prefer to avoid, such as thoughts of being a pedophile or a murderer. A person with Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD) may be asked to go out for a walk without the hat they usually wear to hide their face, or to go to a brightly-lit restaurant with a group of friends. For those with Panic Disorder, exposure might mean driving on the freeway or taking a plane flight. And an individual with Social Anxiety may be urged to go to the mall to initiate conversations with strangers. Read More »

    

There is an excellent article in this week’s Newsweek (October 12, 2009 – available on newsstands October 6th) about the failure of psychotherapists  to use treatments that have been shown to be effective.  The author of the article, Sharon Begley, points out that many therapists follow a treatment approach that is based not on science, but on their personal preference and experience with past clients.

This article is right on target. Read More »

  • OCD is Fake News

    OCD is just fake news that your brain makes up. From the OCD Center of Los Angeles. Helping clients in California and around the world since 1999.

  • HOCD: 30 Things You Need To Know

    HOCD is a type of OCD in which the individual obsesses about their sexual orientation. Here are 30 things you should know about HOCD. From the OCD Center of Los Angeles.

  • Doubt, Denial and OCD

    A discussion of “The Denial Obsession” in OCD, in which sufferers obsess that they don’t really have OCD, but are merely “in denial”. By Lauren McMeikan, MA, and Tom Corboy, MFT, of the OCD Center of Los Angeles.

  • Dermatillomania: A Skin Picker’s Guide to the Dermatologist

    How one woman with Dermatillomania finally opened up to her dermatologist about her longtime struggle with skin picking.

  • Imaginal Exposure for OCD and Anxiety

    Imaginal exposure for the treatment of OCD and anxiety is discussed by Tom Corboy, MFT, of the OCD Center of Los Angeles.

  • ROCD: Relationship OCD and The Myth of “The One”

    ROCD (Relationship OCD) is an often misunderstood variant of OCD. By Sheva Rajaee, MMFT and Tom Corboy, MFT of the OCD Center of Los Angeles.

  • Moral Scrupulosity in OCD: Cognitive Distortions

    Cognitive distortions are common in the Moral Scrupulosity subtype of OCD. Part three of a multi-part series.

  • OCD in the Family

    One mom’s story of her son’s battle with OCD and its profound impact on their family, as told to Elizabeth Kassel, MSW, of the OCD Center of Los Angeles.

  • Scrupulosity in OCD: Cognitive Distortions

    A discussion of cognitive distortions in the religious Scrupulosity subtype of OCD. Part two of a multi-part series.

  • OCD and Eating Disorders

    Diagnostic similarities and differences between OCD and eating disorders are discussed by Kimberley Quinlan, MFT, Clinical Director of the OCD Center of Los Angeles.

  • Harm OCD Treatment With ERP

    Harm OCD treatment using Exposure and Response Prevention (ERP) is discussed by Tom Corboy, MFT, Executive Director of the OCD Center of Los Angeles .

  • My Life with OCD

    The impact of OCD and related anxiety based disorders on the family is often overlooked. In this multi-part series, we present first-hand accounts of the ongoing impact of OCD, BDD, and Bipolar Disorder on one man and his family, as told to Elizabeth Kassel, MSW, of the OCD Center of Los Angeles.

  • Scrupulosity: Where OCD Meets Religion, Faith, and Belief

    The Scrupulosity sub-type of OCD is discussed by Kevin Foss, MFT, of the OCD Center of Los Angeles. Part one of a four part series.

  • Mindfulness for OCD and Anxiety

    Using mindfulness to enhance traditional CBT for OCD and anxiety is discussed by Kimberley Quinlan, MFT, Clinical Director of the OCD Center of Los Angeles.

  • Hoarding, Cluttering, and Compulsive Shopping: My Childhood Story

    One woman’s story of her life as the child of multiple generations of hoarders.

  • OCD and Thought-Action Fusion

    Thought-Action Fusion is a frequent problem for those with OCD. This issue is discussed by Laura Yocum, MFT, of the OCD Center of Los Angeles.

  • OCD, Anxiety, and Resistance

    Resistance and acceptance in OCD and related disorders is discussed by the OCD Center of Los Angeles.

  • Harm OCD Treatment: Cognitive Restructuring

    Harm OCD is often misunderstood, but it can be effectively treated using an integrated treatment plan that includes Cognitive Restructuring. Part three of our ongoing series that explores “Harm OCD” and its treatment .

  • OCD & Anxiety: Five Common Roadblocks to Treatment

    Learn the five common mistakes that interfere with successful treatment of OCD and anxiety. By Kimberley Quinlan, MFT, Clinical Director of the OCD Center of Los Angeles.

  • Harm OCD Treatment: Mindfulness Based CBT

    Harm OCD is an often misunderstood condition that can be effectively treated using Mindfulness integrated with CBT. Part two of a multi-part series from the OCD Center of Los Angeles.

 

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